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HEART AND SOUL

This magazine is not about blowing our own trumpet. This is instead an attempt to clearly present our own unique take on design and on the process of creating impressive, distinctive interiors. And by revisiting some of our many completed projects, we’ve been able to enjoy the fact that our clients have remained our friends.

There are so many stories to tell—a tale of a 1960s hotel on Hyde Park’s doorstep, now rebuilt as glorious individual apartments; a model of modernism with an interior finally worthy of those floor-to-ceiling windows; a piece of brilliant lateral thinking that’s set to change the kitchenscape; and a monochromatic feast reasserting that black is back.

Matthew Yeatman
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All surfaces in volcano black granite, including the wall system for supporting carcass components, lights and accessories.
Polished montank black slate island block and wall units, tall units with 2mm highly polished stainless steel sheeting.
This 1970s modernist home—an angular vision of glass and timber—lurks behind a small development of houses rather more typical of that era. Built in 1972, making its modernism somewhat retrospective, Overwells was named for its elevated position on top of a large hill in Tunbridge Wells.

When they took on Overwells in 2005, the Turners knew they had a major project on their hands. While Mike prized the building’s architecture, the same could not be said for its dated interior. “The vision was to strip it back and make it minimalist—to conserve what merited conservation, and give it the contemporary interior it cried out for” says Mike Turner.

“When it came to refurbish the kitchen, we knew what they wanted in terms of design. Krieder not only understood where we were coming from, paring everything down as we wanted, but were very aware of functionality, too. Several suggestions they made in terms of layout, storage solutions and location of key elements such as fridge and freezer have proved their worth day-in, day-out.”

The working surface is concentrated on an island unit in silky matt granite, which is has been carefully positioned to feel more like a piece of furniture than an overgrown breakfast bar. A single tap with instant boiling water keeps visual clutter at bay, as do the pop-up electrics. One wall is taken up by floor-to-ceiling cabinets in gloss white, broken only by a pair of sleek black ovens—one fan, the other a warming drawer/microwave combination.

“Any project is only as good as the worst supplier, and where the kitchen was concerned, Krieder was consistent from the showroom to the fitting. It was a very good experience.”
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The perfect combination of form and function, the Bora cooktop extractor provides an ingenious solution to an ergonomic problem in the kitchen and frees the designer to position the cooktop wherever works best. The removal of a head-height obstruction allows for uninterrupted sight lines, ideal for open plan living.

The experts agree that this is a milestone in kitchen technology and hasearned aprestigious Red Dot design award for “outstanding innovation and functionality”.

The innovation at the heart of the extractor is the use of air speed rather than air volume—by drawing vapour downwards at four times the speed at which air rises, the extractor grabs the vapour before it has the chance to take off. This highly efficient system means less power consumption and less heat loss in the winter. It is also much quieter than a conventional hood.
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The An-Nur Hotel at 74 Queensborough Terrace used to be a real find for anyone seeking budget accommodation in a great location, just a hop and a skip from Hyde Park in the fashionable Bayswater/Notting Hill area. But as some rather mixed Trip Advisor reviews suggested, it was a building badly in need of a makeover, and such a great address justified serious investment. Its next incarnation would not be as a hotel. Instead, architects RHWL designed a nine-storey, 4,500m² apartment block for the Dorchester Collection, housing 10 apartments. Krieder was commissioned to design and install kitchens in keeping with this prestigious development.

Krieder optimised the space with plenty of reflective surfaces, with high gloss white cabinet fronts and matching splash backs, and glass behind the hobs. Subtle recessed aluminium handles, charcoal-black plinth and slim-profile granite worksurfaces provide definition. The kitchen floors are tiled in light, neutral shades. These are kitchens to be seen and ceiling-to-floor sliding glass doors are all that divide them from the rest of the living area. Transformed from a budget bolt-hole into highly desirable apartments, 74 Queensborough Terrace now complements its surroundings and provides city living at its very best.
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KriederLiving Magazine /02
Next edition May 2015
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